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A deadlier drug: Doctors suspect W-18 is spiking overdoses

From The Philadelphia Inquirer:

Legal synthetics have caused "upwards of 50 deaths" nationwide during the last four months, according to Barry Logan, director of the Center of Forensic Science and Education. The center is the nonprofit research arm of NMS Labs, which tests for the substances at its Willow Grove headquarters.

NMS confirmed one death in Illinois caused by W-18 and is investigating its role in another.

"The bigger problem right now is the designer opioid U-47700 and the designer fentanyl, furanyl, fentanyl," Logan said, adding that NMS had detected the two substances in a string of fatal overdoses that reached from Florida to Maine.


AAA: Driver pot test shown to be invalid

From the Rutland Herald:

A report recently released by the American Automobile Association backs up what Vermont lawmakers heard during the debate over legalizing marijuana: There is no scientific way to prove if someone is under the influence of the drug while driving.

The AAA report looked at the states of Colorado, Washington and Montana, which all have thresholds in place for how much THC can be in someone’s system before they are considered to be under the influence. Those states established a threshold of five nanograms of THC per milliliter of blood.

The report argues that the five nanograms threshold doesn’t work. After looking into the cases of drivers who were pulled over for DUI and had THC in their systems, AAA says a substantial number of those arrested would be misclassified as impaired and those who are actually impaired would not have been flagged by the test for THC.

The report looked into having thresholds from one nanogram to 10 nanograms of THC per milliliter, but it found no level of THC that would back up what police see while conducting field sobriety tests.

Those who frequently use marijuana can show high levels of THC despite not being impaired while occasional users will have the THC leave their system quickly, according to the report.

The report was put together by the Center for Forensic Science Research and Education in Willow Grove, Pennsylvania. That lab also gave the state the same results about not being able to scientifically prove someone is stoned when the state commissioned its own study last year.


A drug ovedose epidemic is hitting Northeast Florida

From The Florida Times-Union (jacksonville.com):

An epidemic of opioid use has been escalating in recent years, but a potent new painkiller has made a deadly appearance on the streets.

The culprit — fentanyl — is a synthetic pain-relieving drug 50 times more powerful than heroin and 100 times more powerful than morphine.

It can be a lethal killer when laced with its weaker cousin, heroin, or even sold undiluted as heroin itself.

A resurgence in heroin use means Jacksonville’s streets have become a killing field for fentanyl.

It is taking lives in escalating rates from California to Florida. Statistics weren’t even collected on fentanyl deaths as recently at 2014 in this state; but since then its use and its victims have skyrocketed.

“I signed out three (fentanyl-caused death) cases today,” Matthew McMullin, the toxicologist for NMS Labs, which conducts all the toxicological studies for the local medical examiner, said earlier this week.

Two of the bodies were originally suspected to be heroin overdoses but turned out to be fentanyl.

The other person had died due to an overdose caused by fentanyl patches usually used for pain relief. Four patches were on the body when usually one is enough to relieve pain.

Posted: 5/12/2016 12:02:00 PM

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Expert offers warning signs for parents to tell if children are on drugs

From WFTV (Orange County, FL):

Dr. Barry Logan and his team attended the Ultra Music Festival in Miami in March, not for the music, but to collect saliva, urine and blood samples from concertgoers for federal drug research.

“It's a great venue for us to study some of what's going on in the designer drug market,” Dr. Barry Logan said.

The goal of Logan and his team is to identify new drugs and to help emergency room doctors stop overdoses before they become deadly.